• Golfer’s Elbow

    Golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylitis) is an overuse injury that affects the inner (medial) elbow.

    The muscles involved originate from the medial epicondyle at the elbow and insert into the wrist, hand and fingers on the palm side. These muscles are flexors that cause the fingers to pull in (as though making a fist) and the wrist to bend towards the elbow pit.

    When this occurs in golfers it tends to affect the bottom hand side – right side for a right handed golfer. Although common with golfers, most cases of golfer’s elbow having nothing to do with playing golf. In fact, some golfers can get tennis elbow, just as some tennis players can get golfer’s elbow.

    Both golfer’s and tennis elbow are similar in that they are both forms of tendinitis (acute inflammatory tendon damage) or tendinosis (chronic low grade inflammatory tendon damage).

    They are different in that the golfer’s affects the inner elbow and tennis elbow effects the outer elbow.

  • Tennis Elbow

    Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is an overuse injury that affects the outer (lateral) elbow.

    The muscles involved originate from the lateral epicondyle at the elbow and insert into the wrist, hand and fingers on the back of the hand side. These muscles are extensors that cause the fingers to straighten out and the wrist to bend back towards the point of the elbow.

    Both golfer’s and tennis elbow are commonly caused by repetitive use of the hand, such as screwing, hammering or similar actions.

    MANAGEMENT

    The management for both Tennis and Golfer’s elbow are similar.

    Acute Phase

    • Avoid aggravating activity
    • Ice 15min at a time, especially after activity
    • Change swing biomechanics or adjust grip or club length for tennis and golf
    • Simple stretching
    • Light soft tissue massage
    • Improve neuromuscular function with chiropractic care

    Chronic Phase

    • Gradual return to activity
    • Continue to ice after activity if required
    • Continue to modify biomechanics to avoid relapse
    • Strengthening exercises
    • Deep soft tissue massage
    • Improve neuromuscular function with chiropractic care
    • Dry needling or acupuncture if required

    In some cases medical treatment is required. This may include anti-inflammatory drugs, cortisone or plasma injections.